Monday, March 31, 2014

National Conference on Undergraduate Research 2014



The University of Kentucky is proud to welcome the
National Conference on Undergraduate Research to its campus. 
English Major/African American Studies Minor, Nathan Moore, will be presenting  Subjugation and the Supernatural: the Underworld in African American Letters. 
(Thu 2:20pm-2:40pm - White Hall Classroom Building, RM 203)

SUBJUGATION AND THE SUPERNATURAL: THE UNDERWORLD IN AFRICAN AMERICAN LETTERS

Nathan Alexander Moore, DaMaris Hill, Dept. of English, University of Kentucky, 1215 Patterson Office Tower Lexington KY 40506-0027
This research explores how to better understand and contextualize race in literature, particularly, social consciousness and oppression. A major component of the African American literary tradition is the social consciousness rooted in the racial discrimination of socially subjugated people and their negotiation of second-class citizenship. Another aspect of this research centers on how the language and themes used with African American texts are ways in which authors try to conceptualize their subjugation in the larger American social environment. Specifically, the works of Harriet Jacobs’ Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl and W.E.B. DuBois’ The Souls of Black Folk serve as expressions of my research. These texts are intrinsically haunted by the themes of racial subjugation, social consciousness and the supernatural. Both authors use mythic imagery and supernatural themes associated with the Underworld to articulate the experience of African Americans. They use theories associated with the American body politic and morality to describe the experience of African Americans. In Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl, Harriet Jacobs details her life and experiences as a slave. Harriet Jacobs was born a slave in South Carolina and successfully escaped the “Demon Slavery”. Jacobs’ text is littered with the brutalization of African American bodies and the allusion that this moral savagery is an inherent pathogen under this peculiar socio-economic institution. In discussion with the greater social consciousness in African American letters, Jacobs crafts a narrative that has gossamer Underworld underpinnings of werewolf lore and allusions to silver as an economic/material agent that influences the viral efficacy of these decrepit conditions. W.E.B. DuBois, a prominent social scientist and activist within African American history and an accomplished author, was greatly influenced by his sociological background. DuBois’ text, The Souls of Black Folk, is blatantly critical of the racialized oppression in the United States and makes striking connections to Underworld and a type of morality rooted in spiritual disparity within the African American community. In conclusion this research furthers the discussion of social consciousness within the African American literary tradition and how this consciousness is conceptualized through the use of mythic imagery and supernaturalism. This research is so very important because it points not only to the spiritual strivings of a historically oppressed people, but furthers the insights into the social and psychological state of African American culture. By focusing this research on the themes of socially perceived and constructed Underworld environments, the reader can better realize that these authors are attempting to articulate a subjugated position that is so cumbersome, that the experience cannot be adequately conveyed using traditional allegories, the author must resort to divine experience. These authors use mythology to connect these supernatural aspects with the overarching and pervasive system of oppression, and subjugated social status.

NCUR oral presentations
topics in
African/African American Studies

Thursday
DECONSTRUCTING DISCOURSES OF THE MIGRANT IN SOUTH AFRICAN HISTORY FROM APARTHEID TO THE PRESENT
Cate Anderson
Thu 11:20am-11:40am, Fine Arts (Little) Library 301

STEVE BIKO: AN INTELLECTUAL OF HISTORY OF SOUTH AFRICAN BLACK CONSCIOUSNESS
Alexander Habibi
Thu 11:20am-11:40am CB 247

ADS OF IDENTITY: TRENDS IN AFRICAN AMERICAN BEAUTY ADVERTISEMENTS
Sakeena Fatima
Thu 2:00pm-2:20pm FA6

ANCIENT EGYPTIAN MUMMIFICATION & MEDICAL PRACTICE & ITS RELATION TO GREEK MEDICAL ADVANCEMENT THROUGH THE PRACTICE OF DISSECTION BY HEROPHILUS & ERASISTRATUS IN ALEXANDRIA
James Vondenberg
Thu 2:20pm-2:40pm

MALAWIAN WOMEN'S POUNDING SONGS
Giulia Perucchio, Joseph Lanning
Thu 2:20pm-2:40pm CB 335

RACIALIZED PATHS AND THE BUSINESS OF TOWNSHIP TOURISM (South Africa)
Emily de Wet
Thu 3:30pm-3:50pm CB 346

AN ALTERNATIVE VACATION: EXPLORING AND EVALUATING CULTURAL HERITAGE TOURISM IN JAMAICA
Michaela Santos, Zelmia Harvey, McKayla Hoffman, Alexandra Pivero
Thu 3:50pm-4:10pm  CB 346

HOSTILE RHETORIC: THE EFFECTS OF THE MEDIA ON THE RWANDAN GENOCIDE
Kelli Richards
Thu 11:00am-11:20am CB 247

NILE WATERFRONTS AND BRIDGES: THE NATURE OF COMMODIFICATION AND DEPUBLICIZATION IN CONTEMPORARY CAIRENE SPACES (Egypt)
Eddie Dioguardi
Thu 11:00am-11:20am Fine Arts (Little) Library 301

NEO-COLONIALISM IN AFRICA OR CONTINENTAL IMPRISONMENT: WHO TO BLAME?
Awa Gaye
Thu 2:00pm-2:20pm, CB 243

PROBLEMATIZING DECENTRALIZATION: THE EFFECTS OF CLASS ON POLITICAL PARTICIPATION IN AFRICA
Lyndsey Czapansky
Thu 2:40pm-3:00pm CB 243

INFLUENCES ON GM FOOD POLICY IN SOUTHERN AFRICA
Olivia Lewis
Thu 2:20pm-2:40pm CB 243

WHAT'S LOVE GOT TO DO WITH IT: HYBRIDIZATION OF MARRIAGE IN THE ASHANTI REGION, GHANA
Katie Rawls
Thu 3:30pm-3:50pm Fine Arts Library 301

Friday
WESTERNERS ABROAD: NINETEENTH CENTURY EGYPT THROUGH THE EYES OF EUROPEAN TOURISTS
Margot Willis
Fri 9:40am-10:00am CB 233

ISLAMIC FEMINISM: A THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK FOR THE PRACTICAL IMPLEMENTATION OF WOMEN’S RIGHTS IN MOROCCO
Fri 9:20am-9:40am, CB 306

“A PEN AND A STETHOSCOPE”: THE HEALTHCARE SITUATION IN SENEGAL AS SEEN THROUGH FIRSTHAND EXPERIENCE
Marianne Macaluso
Fri 9:00am-9:20am POT 145

APPROPRIATION AND IDENTITY IN WILLIAM H. JOHNSON’S SELF-PORTRAITS (U.S.)
Heather Kolnick
Fri 9:40am-10:00am, CB 342

CUSTOMIZATION AND CONFLICT: BIOMEDICINE IN MAASAILAND (Kenya/Tanzania)
Maye Emlein
Fri 10:30am-10:50am CB 237

AFRICAN DANCE: HIDDEN BENEATH THE SURFACE
Sara Palmisano
Fri 10:50am-11:10am,  President’s Room, Singletary Center

GOROVODU MEDICINE AMONGST THE EWES OF GHANA AND TOGO
Nishanth Alluri
Fri 10:50am-11:10am CB 237

CULTURAL TWINS: A QUALITATIVE STUDY OF ROBERT FARRIS THOMPSON’S TEN CANNONS OF AFRICAN ART IN RELATION TO THE CULTURAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL ARCHETYPES IN AFRICA AND BLACK AMERICA  (Nigeria)
Olivia Harp
 Fri 3:50pm-4:10pm  CB 102

SLAVE RELIGIONS (U.S.)
Matthew Rakowski
Fri 3:50pm-4:10pm CB 342

SLAVERY AS ENTERTAINMENT: POWER RELATIONSHIPS OF SLAVERY IN 19TH CENTURY MINSTREL SHOWS (U.S.)
Kelly Schmidt
Fri 4:10pm-4:30pm CB 342

EGYPT POST-MUBARAK AND THE TURKISH MODEL
Salma Abdou
Fri 4:10pm-4:30pm, CB  4 :10 – 4 :30 

Saturday

THE POLITICS OF YOUTH MOBILIZATION AND INTERVENTION IN THE COLOURED TOWNSHIPS OF CAPE TOWN (South Africa)

Jessica Nielsen Kristin Doughty

Sat 9:00am-9:20am

CB 346



CARRIE MAE WEEMS: THE AFRICAN AMERICAN FEMALE NUDE IS “NOT MANET’S TYPE”

Xiaoshan Bao

Sat 9:00am-9:20am CB 340

NORTHSIDE (Lexington)
Melissa Carter
Sat 9:40am-10:00am Briggs Theater

THE IMPACT OF COLONIAL LEGACY ON AFRICAN WOMEN: A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF BRITISH AND FRENCH COLONIAL INSTITUTIONS (Togo, Ghana)
Kaylee Gleason
Sat 9:40am-10:00am, CB 122





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